Construction workers stand at a work site in lower downtown Denver on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016.

(Nathaniel Minor/CPR News)

Colorado’s economy continued its upward climb in 2016, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Median household incomes went up, poverty rates went down and the number of people with health insurance increased.

The median household income for Colorado in 2016 is $65,685, up $1,176 from 2015. Colorado’s poverty rate is at 11 percent, down 0.5 percent, and the uninsured rate is 7.5 percent, down 0.6 percent.

The poverty rate is still 3 percentage points higher than it was at its low point in 2000, said Michelle Webster, the manager of research and policy analysis for the left-leaning Colorado Center on Law & Policy.

“Given how strong the Colorado economy has been the last couple of years, I was hoping we would have seen a larger drop in the poverty rates,” Webster said.

Poverty rates are measured by calculating how many people are living at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level. But Webster’s organization measures poverty based on those living under 200 percent of the poverty level.

“The cost of living in Colorado has increased so much, particularly housing, that if you look at most places in the state you would really need 200 percent of the poverty level to make ends meet and not be struggling,” said Webster. “In 2015, 27 percent of the population were living at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.”

Construction workers stand at a work site in lower downtown Denver on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016.

(Nathaniel Minor/CPR News)

Colorado’s economy continued its upward climb in 2016, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Median household incomes went up, poverty rates went down and the number of people with health insurance increased.

The median household income for Colorado in 2016 is $65,685, up $1,176 from 2015. Colorado’s poverty rate is at 11 percent, down 0.5 percent, and the uninsured rate is 7.5 percent, down 0.6 percent.

The poverty rate is still 3 percentage points higher than it was at its low point in 2000, said Michelle Webster, the manager of research and policy analysis for the left-leaning Colorado Center on Law & Policy.

“Given how strong the Colorado economy has been the last couple of years, I was hoping we would have seen a larger drop in the poverty rates,” Webster said.

Poverty rates are measured by calculating how many people are living at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level. But Webster’s organization measures poverty based on those living under 200 percent of the poverty level.

“The cost of living in Colorado has increased so much, particularly housing, that if you look at most places in the state you would really need 200 percent of the poverty level to make ends meet and not be struggling,” said Webster. “In 2015, 27 percent of the population were living at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.”